Google Vet

I like research. I’m a geek, I like to hunt for information, gather lots of facts and learn from other people’s experiences as well as my own. This way, I feel like I can build a better understanding of what is going on, but also be in a position to ask the vet better questions to ultimately help Harrison and manage this condition to the best of my abilities.

But you do need to be really careful what you read online and approach with skepticism. I remember the behaviourist at the Dogs Trust offering the same advice regarding  training when we first brought Harrison home back in October 2015. She just explained to be wary of bad advice. Over the years research, theory and treatment can advance a lot, so what may have been standard a few years ago may not be the case any longer.

I think the veterinary professionals can be wary too when you ask questions about things you have read online which could be triggers, causes etc. Essentially every dog is different anyway, so in a way you need to just think of it as a blank slate and create your own records and experience log.

At the beginning, some of the things I read online were terrifying and made the whole situation even more daunting. I really feel for some of those I still read about who’s furry companions are suffering very regular seizures, even whilst heavily medicated.

I joined a couple of Facebook groups too, to seek advice and talk to others experiencing the same with their dog(s).  There you get to see other group members painfully sharing final posts and leaving the group,  as they’ve had to have their dog put to sleep. They always thank the group and state how helpful its been to be able to talk and discuss their situation with others going through the same. I would say its more for catharsis, like a kind of a group therapy than to really share tips or experience. Of course that happens as well, but I think ultimately you need to let the veterinary experts guide you correctly when it comes to your dog anyway.

I wanted to share some things I have learned that I wish I had known right at the start;

  • I know this is so much easier said than done, but try to remain calm, although horrific to witness the seizures are generally not harmful. Try to protect their head to avoid them banging it on anything during convulsions and be prepared for them to eliminate during the seizure. They may urinate, defecate or release their anal gland, or all 3…! Believe it or not, the seizures do get easier to deal with, whether this is from being desensitised or you just better at coping and less shocked with it all I don’t know, but you wont feel like a cry baby about it forever – promise!

Continue reading “Google Vet”