Where do we go from here?

It’s been a while since my last post. We have been busy implementing the new medication plan, desperately trying to get Harrison’s condition under control and its been such a tough few weeks. Everything is new territory for us; new signals, warning signs, patterns, different behaviours, different seizure characteristics – it’s all completely new.

He had a few seizures whilst we were at work too, so we had to get a full time dog-sitter in which is very expensive, but we thought we’d stick with it for now whilst we try to get things to a manageable level at least and were advised by the neuro to minimise stress* as much as possible (*separation anxiety). The aim being to reduce the dog-sitting hours over time as his seizures strike less often.

I’m afraid we’re not quite there yet though, things are still very much in progress. We’ve not managed to reach a good stable, control level with his meds and have to keep fine tuning things. But overall, it is not looking good at the moment.

We’re pleased that his seizures have definitely become less violent, he recovers more quickly and he is only suffering 1 at a time now, rather than clustering into several. Which is good progress. But the frequency remains too often still, with seizures occurring every few days. Even the specialist is concerned and surprised by the fact he keeps on having seizures with all the meds he’s on. He’s a unique specimen that’s for sure! Poor little boy.

We’d already accepted when we started with the specialist early September that by Christmas we believe this will be sorted one way or another, his condition will either be under control or he wont be with us any longer. Its horrible to think like that, but I think we have already come to terms with it now. I am feeling less optimistic than before, as the specialist is so surprised his fits continue 😦

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Further bumps in the road

I suppose it was foolish or blindly optimistic to think it would all be plain sailing since we consulted AHT on Harrison’s epilepsy.

Things have definitely been better, but the seizures keep coming, which we’re surprised and anxious about. Even Luisa seemed disappointed when I called to update her. She just explained she has a lot of work to do to get the right balance for him, but at the moment things are quite blind until we get true peak & trough blood samples taken to see how he is adjusting to his new dose, what kind of level does he have in his blood and is there more room to maneuver.

As ever, it never rains it pours, so amidst all of this Harrison has also had an upset tummy on and off too. In addition to the standard knock on effect that his ability to cope alone when we’re out at work seems to take a downward turn also (right back to square one).

So right now feels like groundhog day, we’re going over old ground with some of the behavioural changes and its so hard to see his separation anxiety exacerbated again, especially as we worked so hard to build him up to a good level. But, on a positive note the last couple of seizures (this morning and before that, on Monday morning) he has only suffered one fit in isolation (this is great progress!) thanks to the new seizure emergency plan we have with his meds and also he seemed to bounce back really quickly following the seizure too. He had his usual 1 hour of postictal pacing and bumbling into the walls, but after that was quite lively, energetic and coordinated. The devastating part is that both of these seizures occurred whilst we were out at work, he was alone in the kitchen. We have a camera setup so we can keep an eye on him, heartbreaking watching the footage of him convulsing on his own and coming round all confused and disoriented. Much harder than going through it in real life, to be honest!

 

 

The Expert Experience

The weight has been lifted from my shoulders.

We had an excellent consultation with Luisa De Risio at the AHT on Friday. Luisa is the leading author of a book on canine and feline epilepsy and she is a member of the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. Luisa is an editorial board member of the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery and Associate editor of the Veterinary neurology and neurosurgery journal.

Things had deteriorated very rapidly with Harrison, so we got referred to AHT for what we considered to be the last chance we had to gain some control of Harrison’s condition, or we would have to make the decision to have him put to sleep as he was suffering too much.

So we attended the appointment feeling quite bleak and like this was our last chance really, but safe in the knowledge that if we had to make the final call, at least we could do so knowing we had exhausted every option.

So it was a relief and quite emotional to learn that the specialist is very confident she can help and there is loads of room for improvement. Yippee! So now, onwards & upwards! We can concentrate on getting his condition under control and if we end up with a difficult decision to make later down the line then at least we know we tried everything possible to help him.