Further bumps in the road

I suppose it was foolish or blindly optimistic to think it would all be plain sailing since we consulted AHT on Harrison’s epilepsy.

Things have definitely been better, but the seizures keep coming, which we’re surprised and anxious about. Even Luisa seemed disappointed when I called to update her. She just explained she has a lot of work to do to get the right balance for him, but at the moment things are quite blind until we get true peak & trough blood samples taken to see how he is adjusting to his new dose, what kind of level does he have in his blood and is there more room to maneuver.

As ever, it never rains it pours, so amidst all of this Harrison has also had an upset tummy on and off too. In addition to the standard knock on effect that his ability to cope alone when we’re out at work seems to take a downward turn also (right back to square one).

So right now feels like groundhog day, we’re going over old ground with some of the behavioural changes and its so hard to see his separation anxiety exacerbated again, especially as we worked so hard to build him up to a good level. But, on a positive note the last couple of seizures (this morning and before that, on Monday morning) he has only suffered one fit in isolation (this is great progress!) thanks to the new seizure emergency plan we have with his meds and also he seemed to bounce back really quickly following the seizure too. He had his usual 1 hour of postictal pacing and bumbling into the walls, but after that was quite lively, energetic and coordinated. The devastating part is that both of these seizures occurred whilst we were out at work, he was alone in the kitchen. We have a camera setup so we can keep an eye on him, heartbreaking watching the footage of him convulsing on his own and coming round all confused and disoriented. Much harder than going through it in real life, to be honest!

 

 

The Expert Experience

The weight has been lifted from my shoulders.

We had an excellent consultation with Luisa De Risio at the AHT on Friday. Luisa is the leading author of a book on canine and feline epilepsy and she is a member of the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. Luisa is an editorial board member of the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery and Associate editor of the Veterinary neurology and neurosurgery journal.

Things had deteriorated very rapidly with Harrison, so we got referred to AHT for what we considered to be the last chance we had to gain some control of Harrison’s condition, or we would have to make the decision to have him put to sleep as he was suffering too much.

So we attended the appointment feeling quite bleak and like this was our last chance really, but safe in the knowledge that if we had to make the final call, at least we could do so knowing we had exhausted every option.

So it was a relief and quite emotional to learn that the specialist is very confident she can help and there is loads of room for improvement. Yippee! So now, onwards & upwards! We can concentrate on getting his condition under control and if we end up with a difficult decision to make later down the line then at least we know we tried everything possible to help him.

Celebrating a mini victory!

Not wanting this blog to just be the negative or pessimistic ramblings of a desperate woman, I thought it was time to write something a bit more positive!

I am so pleased to say that Harrison is feeling much better today, thank goodness! 🙂 He’s celebrating by chomping on a brand new stag antler! 😀

He is still not 100% his usual self, but much closer to that than he was at the start of the week. Still a bit barky and bitey, but overall more calm. Our boy is coming back to us 😀

So we have our appointment with the neurologist tomorrow morning and will be able to discuss an action plan for how we move forward.

I believe with the right mix of medication and the appropriate meds for during/post seizure we will be able to manage this beast and Harrison can have a lovely, normal life.

Isn’t it funny how catching up on some much needed sleep alters your mindset completely on challenging situations! Being able to get on and do some housework yesterday was very therapeutic also and the window cleaner came today too 🙂

Current mood: Feeling optimistic & determined!

Resetting the seizure counter back to zero

Yep, today was one of those days unfortunately. After an 18 day break since the last fits, Harrison suffered a couple more. He is resting now after the usual hour of pacing about wanting to eat the world.

He’s been a little tinker both yesterday and today, which makes me wonder whether this led to the seizures. Yesterday he’d gotten into my handbag and eaten some homemade fudge and today he’d had 3 overripe bananas (including skins) off the kitchen counter. Which he has never done before and they’ve always been sitting there on the side, out of his reach we thought but obviously not! Sometimes I have avocados ripening too, so thank goodness they weren’t in there as avocado isn’t very good for dogs, especially not the stones, which he would have undoubtedly eaten!

We’re going on holiday 1 week today, was hoping not to have any more seizures before we go but that’s the nature of the beast. Dreading leaving him 😦 we’re leaving him in safe hands, in our own home so minimal disruption for him.

His annual vaccines are due as well, I’m going to put them off for as long as possible but also ask whether we can have a waiver for a while, until we manage to get into a bit more of a routine with him. The fewer things that could cause or lead to a seizure, the better really.

I hate this illness so much! When there’s been recent activity it makes you question everything. Are we really doing the right thing to try and medicate him and tame this beast?

 

 

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(hopefully) it’s just a blip

Harrison had another couple of seizures last night unfortunately, just after 18:00. He’d vomited his breakfast in the morning, but re-ate it so we weren’t concerned he didn’t get his medication. Hope things settle down soon, we’re supposed to be going away on 6th September, seriously won’t even feel like it if this recent spate of seizures doesn’t subside.

As usual, he paced around restlessly for about an hour after the seizures and we’d given him 50mg of diazepam to break the cluster, but then chilled out and we didn’t encounter anymore issues during the night which is great! Let’s hope for a trouble-free weekend now, what’s left of it.

Since we added in libromide to his medication mix last Monday he had been encountering some adverse side-effects, which have subsided a little thankfully (vocalisation, restlessness), but it can still take a little while for the medication to reach the therapeutic serum range and provide that stabilising effect we really need at the moment. This is very much a matter of patience, not expecting miracles overnight and managing as best you can in the interim. It’s so hard to see your beloved dog go through this though and breaks my heart reading about all the lovely pets who have to be put to sleep as a result of their epilepsy or associated conditions on some of the Facebook groups I mention on the RESOURCES & INFO page of my blog. My heart goes out to all of those people who have lost their pet due to this awful condition. It made me wonder about what humans who suffer with epilepsy have to endure as well, how awful. At least you can explain to humans though once they’re old enough, so they know what’s going on. The worst thing for Harrison is how frightened he is immediately before and afterwards, poor little baby.

One of the founding members of the Facebook groups has setup a couple of fundraising pages. One is to support those who can’t afford a neurological consultation and the relevant  tests etc, as not covered by their insurance or they don’t have any. The other is to raise a bit of money to setup a service to raise awareness, knowledge share, advise and guide others who are managing this condition with their pets. To support them in asking the right questions and knowing when to be firm or assertive and challenge their vet where needed etc. No one knows your animal like you do, even if you don’t have the veterinary knowledge, you are the one who speaks for them and has their best interests in mind. I found this element quite challenging when all the info we were receiving was conflicting. But essentially, not many vets or neurologists are specialised in epilepsy and eventually that’s what you become, with enough time dedicated to research and learning about the condition and treatment. Please see links below to the fundraising pages in case of interest and you’re feeling generous! 🙂

Rusty’s Memorial Neuro Consult Fund

Canine Epilepsy Awareness

 

The first seizure

That first seizure was actually not the worst one. Yes, the first one is definitely very scary and everything is unknown, but it feels perfectly reasonable that it could be a one off and then the vet leads you to believe that it could be a one off too. Then, your worst fears are realised and it keeps happening 😦 the second time was by far the worst. It catches you totally off guard, even though you have gone away and done your research, you’re still clinging on to the idea that it could have been a one off. Or at least, that it wouldn’t happen again for a long while. Witnessing your poor little pooch have a fit is truly horrific, you feel totally helpless, they are terrified and worst of all, you can’t explain to them what the hell is going on.

Since 23rd February (15 days ago), Harrison has had 7 seizures. The vet advised after the first one that any more frequent than once a month would require lifelong medication to manage the condition. So, he has started his first tablet trial today, something called pexion. Really hope it works out for him, otherwise we’ll have to try many more to find the most suitable and effective drug for him, or a combination. Personally I am fairly opposed to human medication, let alone for my animal. I prefer a more natural and holistical approach wherever possible, but the risk of long term damage is too high with such regular seizures, or by having several in quick succession (called “clusters”), so we have to try him with medication now.

The good news is that even though the condition is incurable, a dog with epilepsy can still lead a full and happy life, if you can learn how to manage their unique needs properly – every dog is different. So, this is the start of a new chapter for us!